positivity

To paraphrase the law of attraction, the thoughts, energy and actions that you put into the universe will come back to you in some way shape or form. The power of our thoughts and actions are powerful enough to attract whatever goals or objectives you have in mind. This can also be true of negativity. Sometimes when we are sick, and we think about how sick we are and we end up feeling worse than we did before we thought about it. Our symptoms start to show, and we become hyper-sensitive to sensations we may not have felt before.

In recovery from addiction, one of the most powerful skills to learn is to keep a positive mindset. If the law of attraction (which has great examples to support it) is in fact true, then keeping positive in early recovery can be crucial. Telling yourself that you are going to succeed can lead to success, simply by putting that thought into the universe. This can also be called self talk. In recovery from addiction, negative self talk gradually lessens through actions such as attending recovery support meetings, talking to a therapist, attending an outpatient rehabilitation or treatment program, taking medications that are prescribed by a physician or psychiatrist, and/or meditation and a spiritual practice. These are all things that can help support a healthy and positive mental mindset.

Saying Yes to Life

Often times, when asked in early recovery from addiction to attend support groups or to go out on activities our first instinct is to say no. If we begin to be conscious of this habit, we may see that we pause before answering. A pause between answering questions of whether or not we would like to attend some sort of social or leisurely activity may allow us the opportunity to consider whether or not we honestly want to attend, or if our habitual use of the word no is driving our thought process and decision making skills. By eliminating or considering minimizing the use of the word no we allow ourselves the space to have new opportunities; opportunities we may not have had experienced if it weren’t for this pause.

Do the Next Right Thing

Many addicts in early recovery hate this phrase or “cliche.” Doing the next right thing simply means taking action instead of remaining stagnant. By doing the next right thing, we may eliminate our negative self talk completely, or at least take time away from our negativity to allow ourselves new experiences, such as a recovery meeting or a leisure activity as mentioned. A body in motion stays in motion, and a body in motion seldom allows a mind, after time, to stay negative or to remain in a state of contemplation. When we are moving we aren’t thinking, unless we are thinking about what action we are taking or what motion we are engaged in. Movement is beneficial, and doing the next right thing or even the next thing can be essential for recovery in early recovery from drugs and alcohol.

Don’t Give Up

We can learn from each other, which is an important factor in growth. Sometimes, our mindsets can be affected by those we surround ourselves with. Considering our surroundings, our support systems, and our friends, we can quickly analyze whether or not we are setting ourselves up for success. Through practices like meditation we can learn to quiet our minds, or at least learn to observe our thoughts and to let them come and to pass. Remaining positive is essential in recovery, and many successful people will confess that their success is a direct result of remaining positive and believing in themselves. If you have recurring negative thoughts, talk to a friend or a therapist about them, try journaling about them or meditating. There are many ways to remain positive. Your reality is created by your thoughts; you attract what you put into the universe, and if you believe that you can live a happy, healthy, sober life, then you’ll put the action in to do so, and the universe will conspire in remarkable ways to show you that it is in fact listening, and it may surprise you that it is working in your favor. Remember, you may be amazed before you are halfway through!



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