Signs of Bipolar Depression Relapse

Living with bipolar disorder can be seen as an exercise in both patience and proactive planning. Patience, because the fact is that bipolar disorder is a chronic and complex mental health disorder that is ever shifting, and proactive planning is key to managing the warning signs of an impending relapse.

And relapse there will be. Bipolar disorder is a lifelong diagnosis, the alternating manic and depressive episodes that one must learn to manage. Even the most valiant efforts to stave off recurrence may fail when signs of bipolar depression relapse are flashing. But doing something is a better option than doing nothing when impending relapse is on the horizon.

Sometimes a relapse will completely surprise the person. There may not be any foreseeable signs of bipolar depression relapse on the horizon—it just happens. Even though the relapse was unforeseen, there are still steps to take to mitigate the symptoms of depression. Living with bipolar disorder is all about management.

About Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder, once known as manic-depressive disorder, is a mental illness that features extreme shifts between manic emotional states and depressive emotional states. In most cases, bipolar disorder appears in the teen or early adult years, and affects 2.6% of the U.S. adult population, or approximately 5.7 million people, according to the National Institute on Mental Illness. Of those diagnosed with bipolar disorder, more than 8 out of 10 will have a severe form of the mental health disorder.

While bipolar disorder is characterized by extreme mood swings between mania and depression, there are variations of the disorder. These include:

Bipolar I Disorder: Features dramatic mood swings between manic episodes and depressive episodes, with normal period between them.

Bipolar II Disorder: Features at least one depressive episode and one hypomanic (less severe than manic) episode. Depression symptoms are more prevalent.

Cyclothymic Disorder: Features milder versions of both mania and depression that occur often.

Bipolar Disorder Not Otherwise Specified: Features the symptoms of mania and depression that do not meet diagnostic criteria.

Common Bipolar Depression Relapse Signs

Although the actual cause of a bipolar relapse is still unknown, there may be a pattern of triggers or situations that can lead to a bipolar depression relapse. Lack of sleep and too much stress are common triggers that can bring on a bipolar relapse. Research shows that at least 75% of those with bipolar disorder will experience relapse, according to a study published in the Iranian Journal of Psychiatry. Bipolar II disorder, which is defined by the prevalence of depressive episodes, is more prone to relapse.

Some of the signs of bipolar depression relapse include:

  • Increasing irritability
  • Restlessness
  • More headaches, stomachaches
  • Change in eating habits
  • Sleep problems
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Fuzzy thinking
  • Difficulty making decisions
  • Avoiding social interaction, skipping school, staying home from work
  • Not taking medication, missing therapy appointments
  • Feeling flat
  • Thoughts of suicide

Anticipate Potential Triggers and Take Preventative Steps

When the signs of an impending relapse are seen, as often they are not and depression can suddenly appear without warning, there are some steps to take to ward off the relapse. Because bipolar is a chronic condition, it may help track the triggers or symptoms of the disorder by keeping a journal. This is a tool that may begin to reveal a pattern of signs that can help the individual become more aware of a forthcoming relapse back into depression.

Also, just anticipating events or situations that might trigger a depressive episode can help prepare for it. Noting on a calendar a few days before a potentially triggering event can help one focus on self-care, to take proactive steps that can possibly diminish the impact of the event. This might include massage therapy, acupuncture, mindfulness meditation, getting quality sleep, eating nutrition rich foods, and seeing the therapist.

Managing Bipolar Disorder

Although there is no cure for bipolar disorder, the condition can be managed using a combination of psychotherapy, medication, and lifestyle adjustments. By being vigilant and proactive with these interventions, an individual can expect to enjoy more stability and overall wellness while living a productive life.

Medication: Mood stabilizing medications, such as antipsychotics and antidepressants, are the most commonly prescribed drugs for treating bipolar disorder. Lithium is the most commonly prescribed medication for controlling bipolar disorder, while anticonvulsants and SSRIs are also utilized often as well. It is important for patients to comply with their medication schedule and dosing to maintain stability.

Psychotherapy: Because thoughts can influence behaviors, and negative thoughts can lead to self-destructive behaviors, cognitive behavioral therapy is an excellent therapy for helping individuals with bipolar disorder. CBT helps one identify and correct the irrational and troublesome behavior patterns associated with bipolar disorder.

Lifestyle: Establishing a healthy routine is an essential aspect of managing bipolar disorder. Sticking to a regular sleep schedule, getting regular exercise, eating nutritiously, and managing stress are all intrinsic to achieving stability and reducing the probability of a relapse.

Even a diligent adherence to these important treatment methods may not deter the signs of bipolar depression relapse. Bipolar disorder remains an unexplained mystery in many ways, including the cycling of relapses. However, by charting thoughts, feelings, situations, trigger exposures, emotional issues, work and family issues, and health conditions, managing pre-relapse situations and taking proactive steps can help avoid the onset of a relapse.

Elevation Behavioral Health Residential Treatment for Bipolar Disorder

Elevation Behavioral Health is a Los Angeles-based mental health provider that provides residential services for individuals with bipolar disorder. When symptoms have worsened and relapse becomes a chronic issue, a stay at Elevation Behavioral Health may provide the intensive and focused care needed. Our expert clinical team will design a customized treatment protocol that addresses each individual’s unique bipolar features for best results. Using a medley of evidence-based therapies and holistic approaches, Elevation Behavioral Health addresses all aspects of the person. For more details about our residential program, please contact Elevation today at (888) 561-0868.

Anxiety and Inability to Focus

Anxiety disorder can profoundly impact our lives, beyond the common symptoms of sensitivity to stress. One of the ways anxiety can disrupt our daily lives is through impaired cognitive functioning. Anxiety and inability to focus at work or school appear to be interconnected. As anxiety symptoms escalate, the mind struggles to stay on task.  Short-term memory functions are affected by anxiety as well, causing difficulty in remembering tasks or projects that are due, only adding to the work performance challenges.

Nearly one in five American adults are affected by anxiety disorder, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Learning techniques that can help manage the symptoms of anxiety and inability to focus is an essential strategy for individuals struggling with an anxiety disorder.

About Generalized Anxiety Disorder

The most common type of anxiety is called generalized anxiety disorder, or GAD, with about 3.1% of the population, or nearly 7 million adults, struggling with this mental health disorder. GAD is characterized by pervasive worrying, so much so that it can impair daily functioning. The energy expended worrying about coulda, woulda, shouldas all day can be very taxing, impacting both energy levels and mental functioning. Individuals with GAD tend to ruminate over events that have already occurred, second-guessing themselves, or they may dwell on upcoming events and worry incessantly about anticipated outcomes. Fear and worry drive this disorder, with symptoms that include:

  • Excessive worry
  • Hyper-vigilance
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Restlessness
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Sweating
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Short-term memory problems

How Anxiety Can Affect Concentration

Individuals who struggle with anxiety often experience symptoms of mental confusion, foggy thinking, forgetfulness, and difficulty concentrating. While these symptoms may ebb and flow depending on the day and the stress load, they can be very frustrating for those with anxiety disorder.

Persistently elevated stress hormones, such as cortisol and adrenaline, are the cause of the brain fog that plagues individuals with anxiety disorder. This stress response has an adverse effect on cognitive functions, such as anxiety and inability to focus and short-term memory functioning. Poor concentration and lack of focus are common symptoms of anxiety disorder.

5 Steps to Help Manage Anxiety Symptoms

Understanding how anxiety can affect cognitive functioning is the first step in creating a strategy for managing the anxiety and inability to focus. By accepting that you will have to make some adjustments to work or study habits, you can begin to put into practice these new methods and begin to improve your mental focus, leading to more productivity and a boost in self-confidence. Some tips for improving cognitive functioning at work include:

  1. Take short breaks often. Instead of attempting to plow through a large block of focused work time, which will lead to wandering attention and loss of interest in the task, break up the work into smaller segments with short breaks in between.
  2. Make a to-do list. Start each day with a list of items that must be accomplished during the day. Allow for free time during the day as well, to intersperse enjoyable activities that will help keep you from burning out.
  3. Practice mindfulness. Training yourself to stay in the moment can help improve focus and concentration on the project at hand. When the mind begins to wander, rein it back in and refocus on the present moment.
  4. Switch tasks. When you begin to find yourself spacing out and losing focus, switch to a different task. Alternating your attention between the two tasks can help relieve boredom and stimulate better concentration.
  5. Mind your own business. Anxiety can lead to excessive worrying about things outside your control. Too often the mind wanders to unproductive worrying that stokes anxiety and inability to focus. Keep your mind on the task at hand.

Residential Anxiety Treatment for Intensive Therapy

For many people with anxiety disorder, outpatient psychiatric services may provide the means to manage the disorder effectively. Some, however, may find their anxiety disorder worsening over time. When reaching the point where relentless worry causes impaired daily functioning due to anxiety and inability to focus at all, a residential anxiety treatment program may be the best treatment option.

The residential anxiety treatment program can take a deeper look into the issues that may be impacting the anxiety using a more focused approach. Upon intake, a thorough evaluation of the anxiety disorder will provide information, such as a detailed medical and psychiatric history and a review of medications, which can allow the psychiatrist to diagnose the specific features of the anxiety disorder. Using this as a template, an individualized treatment plan can be crafted.

The comprehensive treatment approach will involve several therapeutic sessions during the day, such as individual psychotherapy, group therapy, life skills, family therapy, mindfulness training, deep breathing exercises, yoga, and other relevant therapies. Cognitive behavioral therapy can help individuals who struggle with anxiety and inability to focus by identifying disordered thoughts that may fuel the anxiety.

Anxiety Aftercare Services

It is important to continue to receive aftercare services following a residential program in order to reinforce the new strategies learned in treatment. Outpatient therapy is recommended on a weekly basis, which provides the ongoing support needed as the individual transitions back to their regular daily life. These sessions provide the necessary “tune-ups” when new stressors emerge that can trigger anxiety and psychological setbacks.

Finding a support group is also a beneficial aftercare activity. Being able to discuss daily challenges with others who struggle with anxiety disorder provides valuable peer support and creates a sense that one is not alone with these challenges. Group participants can also learn new techniques from each other for managing daily stressors and improving the quality of life.

Elevation Behavioral Health is a Leading Residential Mental Health Center in Los Angeles

Elevation Behavioral Health provides a proven, evidence-based treatment for the full spectrum of anxiety disorders in a residential setting. Elevation offers a warm, intimate escape from the stressors of daily life that keep your mental health reeling. At Elevation Behavioral Health you can focus your energy and attention on learning new ways to manage anxiety and improve focus. For more information about our program, please contact Elevation today at (888) 561-0868.

severe emotional trauma symptoms

Each of us has a unique and personal emotional history, a story unlike anyone else’s. Not only is our life experience our very own, but so is our temperament or personality, which influences in a significant way how we will respond to the presenting stressors in our lives. When we encounter a traumatizing event, how we as individuals process that experience will draw from our own psychological backdrop.

This means, for example, that if we have a childhood history of sexual abuse, we will respond differently to a sexual assault in adulthood, with deep roots of emotional memory attached to the experience. This compounded trauma may result in a sustained trauma disorder, referred to as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Someone without an emotional scar from childhood may also experience trauma disorder, however they may not suffer the severe emotional trauma symptoms, and they may be able to process through the traumatic experience at a faster pace.

Because of the individualized response to witnessing or experiencing a traumatic event, it is important to know that seeking psychological support is always helpful. When a trauma has the effect of paralyzing the individual, seriously disrupting daily life and impairing functioning, a residential mental health program would be an appropriate level of care.

Understanding Psychological Trauma

A traumatic event is something that is witnessed or experienced firsthand that creates a sense of deep fear and lack of control over the situation. Examples of traumas might include:

  • Physical assault
  • Sexual assault
  • Atrocities related to military combat
  • Serious auto accident
  • Sudden death of a loved one
  • Serious health event or diagnosis
  • Natural disaster
  • Terrorism

The traumatic event is often something that was unexpected, sudden, unpredicted. The individual experiencing the event may feel powerless, which adds to the severe emotional trauma symptoms. But even life events that evoke a sense of fear of the unknown or a feeling of having no control over the outcome can also be considered traumatic. These might include a divorce, having to relocate suddenly, a parent’s health issues, or loss of a job and other major financial setbacks.

Severe Emotional Trauma Symptoms

Individuals struggling with the aftermath of experiencing a trauma may exhibit a range of symptoms, including psychological and physical. These symptoms may include:

Psychological symptoms of trauma

  • Detachment
  • Emotional numbness
  • Depression
  • Feelings of guilt or shame
  • Irritability
  • Anger
  • Mood swings
  • Confusion
  • Nightmares, flashbacks
  • Loss of interest in usual activities
  • Withdraw from friends and family
  • Obsessive/compulsive symptoms
  • Anxiety

Physical symptoms of trauma

  • Insomnia
  • Dry mouth
  • Change in eating and sleeping habits
  • Vague symptoms of aches and pains
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Muscle tension
  • Hyper-arousal, easily startled
  • Fatigue

The symptoms that follow a trauma may emerge immediately after the event or may be delayed, even by weeks or months. In some individuals the symptoms continue to worsen over time, culminating in a PTSD diagnosis.

Types of Treatment for Trauma Disorder

Treatment for trauma disorder relies on a blend of therapies and activities as well as medication when indicated.

  • Individual psychotherapy is very beneficial, especially behavior therapies such as cognitive behavioral therapy, prolonged exposure therapy, and dialectical behavior therapy.
  • Group therapy, including family therapy, is also helpful as it allows trauma victims to share about their experience and express their emotions in a safe, supportive setting.
  • Exposure therapy helps reduce the impact of the traumatic memories by incrementally desensitizing the individual to the event by exposing them to triggers.
  • Psychodynamic therapy helps for deep-seated childhood traumas, as this type of therapy explores early experiences to see how they are impacting present life.

Other Therapies for Treating Psychological Trauma

Holistic therapies, such as yoga, mindfulness meditation, massage therapy, hypnotherapy, and guided imagery can be useful in helping the individual overcome the fear-based stress that follows a trauma. These activities all promote relaxation while providing relief from stress.

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, or EMDR, is useful for helping to desensitize the individual from the impact of the traumatic memories. In an 8-part program the therapist asks the individual to use their eyes to follow an object or finger back and forth while they discuss the trauma with the person. By focusing their attention on the stimulus it helps to reduce the impact of what they are discussing.

Keeping a journal is also helpful in resolving the pain of a trauma. Just writing down the thoughts, fears, memories, and emotions regarding the traumatic event can help sort out the issues around the trauma while diffusing some of the potency of the memories.

Elevation Behavioral Health Provides Residential Treatment for Trauma Disorder

Elevation Behavioral Health is a residential mental health treatment center in Los Angeles. Elevation treats severe emotional trauma symptoms using an integrated approach that includes conventional evidence-based therapies, medication, EMDR, and holistic therapies. Each individual patient’s unique trauma history will dictate the customized therapy he or she will receive. For more details about our residential program, please contact Elevation Behavioral Health today at (888) 561-0868.

So Depressed Can't Function

Anyone who has ever suffered through a bout of intense, prolonged depression can attest to how depleted it makes you feel. In what seems like an instant, you are reduced to a shadow of yourself, so depressed, can’t function, and unable to accomplish even the most mundane tasks. Depression is a potent, often complex mental health disorder that can take even the most high-functioning adults right down into that dark rabbit hole of despair.

Eventually, the effects of the major depressive episode will touch all aspects of life. Coworkers will complain that you are not pulling your weight, significant others will feel they are being neglected, and your general health will begin to suffer as well. Depression is a serious mental illness that should not be ignored.

Crawling out of that rabbit hole takes effort, something you might not feel you have the ability to muster up. But with expert psychiatric intervention, treatment compliance, and lots of patience, daily functioning will be restored along with your quality of life.

What Causes Depression?

Why do some people manage to cycle through emotional setbacks, such as loss and grief, divorce or relationship breaking up, job loss, or financial devastation, while others get stuck and sink deeper and deeper into the grip of clinical of depression? Science is still unclear about the exact cause of major depression. Clinical studies are going, seeking answers through the study of brain chemistry, gut health, and genetic markers.

There are, however, some identified factors that can contribute to the development of depression. These include:

  • Genetics. Family members who also struggle with depression is a strong indicator that you may also.
  • Abuse. Past history of physical or sexual abuse
  • Trauma. Witnessing or experiencing a highly traumatic event
  • Loss. Sudden unexpected loss of a loved one
  • Medical conditions. Certain health issues such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, thyroid conditions, multiple sclerosis, HIV, and stroke
  • Medications. Certain drugs list depression as a side effect
  • Personality. Coping skills and personality type
  • Substance abuse. Depression can coexist with alcohol or drug addiction

The Symptoms of Depression

When you notice that you are so depressed, can’t function at even the routine daily tasks in a given day, you may indeed be experiencing a major depressive episode. According to the DSM-5, when the following symptoms (a cluster of five or more) persist for more than two weeks it is indicative of major depressive disorder. The symptoms of depression include:

  • Feelings of sadness and despair persisting most of the time
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Slowed motor and cognitive functioning
  • Sleep dysfunction, either hypersomnia or insomnia
  • Sudden weight loss or gain
  • Loss of interest in things once enjoyed
  • Inappropriate feelings of guilt or shame
  • Difficulty in concentrating or making decisions
  • Persistent thoughts of dying or suicidal ideation

If you are experiencing thoughts of suicide along with at least four other symptoms for more than two weeks, you should seek professional psychiatric support as soon as possible.

How is Depression Treated?

When someone is feeling so depressed, can’t function, and is becoming hopeless, all they care about is getting better. Becoming whole again. The traditional treatment protocol for major depression includes a combination of antidepressant drug therapy and psychotherapy. The medication can help stabilize or adjust serotonin levels in the brain chemistry, although several drugs may have to be trialed before finding the one that is most effective in minimizing depression symptom and side effects that are tolerable.

Psychotherapy modalities are selected based on the underlying issues. There are exposure therapies for helping those who have experienced trauma, psychodynamic therapy is a deeper dive into childhood issues that might have set up the depression, and cognitive behavioral therapy can help the patient identify irrational thinking that leads to maladaptive behaviors.

Adjunctive therapies are a valuable component of depression therapy as well. TMS therapy uses magnetic fields to stimulate underactive brain cells common in depression patients. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) can assist with trauma-based depression. Holistic therapies, such as mindfulness training, can help individuals can help reduce stress and promote relaxation by shifting thoughts from negative ruminating toward being in the present moment.

Lifestyle changes are also an important element in treating depression. Getting regular exercise helps produce endorphins and dopamine, natural mood enhancers. A healthy diet that is high in lean proteins, whole grains, seeds, nuts, and fresh vegetables and fruits is also beneficial to overall mood.

Elevation Behavioral Health Provides Comprehensive Depression Treatment

Elevation Behavioral Health is a residential mental health program based in Los Angeles. At Elevation, our dedicated clinical staff treats each patient with dignity and respect as we partner with them to help alleviate the symptoms of depression. Using an integrated approach that involves both traditional and experiential treatment elements, Elevation has helped many individuals segue from being so depressed can’t function toward restoring a fully functioning life. For more information about our residential program, please connect with Elevation Behavioral Health today at (888) 561-0868.

anxiety makes me feel like i am losing my mind

Anxiety can be absolutely debilitating, keeping you in a state of constant fight-or-flight mode at the slightest little trigger. You may attempt to reason with yourself, that this or that stress-inducing trigger is no big deal, but your brain chemistry is locked and loaded to take you through the spectrum of anxiety symptoms—sweaty palms, racing heart, shallow breathing, palpitations—you cannot seem to escape this cycle.

Many who approach a therapist with the complaint, “Anxiety makes me feel like I am losing my mind!” are suffering greatly. They want to find ways to manage the anxiety so they can live a normal, productive life, and that is entirely possible with the right treatment plan. Anxiety treatment is often very effective at greatly reducing the daily struggle with stress that has held you captive.

Help! Anxiety Makes Me Feel Like I am Losing my Mind

Anxiety disorder is a broad category of mental health disorders, each with the commonality of excessive worry or fear driving it. Anxiety disorders are very common, with 40 million people struggling with one each year, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness. An anxiety disorder is different from the common temporary fear experienced before having to make a presentation or trying out for something. We all experience those very normal sensations when we are out of our comfort zone. Anxiety disorders, however, are very intrusive, often becoming so difficult to manage that it impacts one’s lifestyle.

When someone suffers from anxiety something will trigger a cascade of symptoms, with each type of anxiety disorder having its own unique features. Generally, however, anxiety symptoms include:

  • Feelings of dread and apprehension
  • Being perpetually on alert for danger
  • Racing heart or palpitations
  • Shaking
  • Sweating
  • Hyperventilating
  • Shortness of breath, holding one’s breath
  • Stomach upset, diarrhea
  • Feeling jumpy or restless
  • Insomnia
  • Headaches

Different Types of Anxiety Disorders

The anxiety spectrum of disorders includes:

  • Generalized anxiety disorder: Features constant excessive worry for much of the day, resulting in headaches, muscle tension, nausea, and trouble concentrating.
  • Panic disorder: Sudden and unpredictable feelings of overwhelming terror, causing heart palpitations, shortness of breath, chest pain, and dizziness. May lead to social isolation to avoid having an attack.
  • Social anxiety disorder: Intense and irrational fear of being judged or critiqued. Fear of being humiliated in public. Causes social isolation or minimizing social interaction.
  • Specific phobias: Irrational fear of a specific thing, place, or situation. To manage this fear, the individual goes to great measures to avoid triggers.
  • Trauma disorder, PTSD: Unresolved trauma can lead to avoidance of people, places, or situations that trigger memories of the traumatic event. Flashbacks, nightmares, or repeated thoughts of the trauma stoke anxiety symptoms.
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder: Obsessive worries about such things as germs, causing harm, or a need for order drives compulsive behaviors that attempt to manage the symptoms of anxiety caused by the obsession.

How to Manage Anxiety

When the symptoms of anxiety have you saying, “Anxiety makes me feel like I am losing my mind,” it is time to meet with a mental health professional. At the initial meeting, a therapist will evaluate what type of anxiety you are suffering from and design an individualized treatment plan to help manage symptoms. Treatment is usually an integrated approach involving psychotherapy, medication, and stress-reducing holistic activities.

Psychotherapy for anxiety disorders will be determined based on the type of anxiety, but cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been effective in helping individuals identify distorted or irrational thoughts and the maladaptive behavioral response to them. CBT then guides the individual toward replacing those with positive self-messaging resulting in constructive, productive behaviors.

Medication for anxiety disorders may involve benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax), drugs that swiftly produce a sedative response to calm nerves. In some cases, antidepressants are used to treat anxiety as well.

Holistic Therapies That Help Manage Stress

Including holistic therapies in the treatment plan is becoming more and more common. This is because these mostly Eastern-inspired activities are excellent complimentary interventions to the traditional psychotherapy. Some of the holistic activities accessed for treating anxiety include:

  • Yoga
  • Mindfulness meditation
  • Guided imagery
  • Hypnotherapy
  • Acupuncture
  • Massage therapy
  • Equine therapy

Elevation Behavioral Health Provides Effective Treatment for Anxiety Disorders

Elevation Behavioral Health is an upscale residential mental health treatment center in Los Angeles. If you recognize that declaration, “Anxiety makes me feel like I am losing my mind,” then seek the treatment you deserve to regain your quality of life. When outpatient care is not providing the results you desire, or your anxiety disorder worsens, consider a residential program where you can focus all of your attention on healing. Treatment is much more intensive and focused in a residential program, and by taking a break from the usual stressors or triggers in your everyday life, a stay at Elevation Behavioral Health can produce a significant and sustained reduction in anxiety symptoms. For more information about our program, reach out to Elevation Behavioral Health today at (888) 561-0868.

trauma counseling

A traumatic experience can remain deeply troubling for a period of time, impacting daily life and overall wellness. Having witnessed or personally experienced a traumatic event may leave psychological wounds and a heightened sense of emotional arousal that can cause impaired functioning, ill health, or relationship problems. While most people who experience trauma will eventually process the fallout, some may go on to develop pot-traumatic stress disorder, a prolonged and more severe form of trauma disorder.

Trauma counseling is a key element in the process of healing after experiencing a shocking or distressing event. A trauma therapist is trained to use specialized therapies that help take the edge off the traumatic memory, allowing the individual to become less sensitive to the memories of it, or the people, places, or situations that may trigger the memories. Trauma counseling, and adjunctive therapies that compliment the counseling, allow the individual to gradually move forward in their lives.

Trauma Defined

So how is a trauma different from any other upsetting event? A traumatic event tends to cause an intense psychological response when the individual feels they are in a dangerous or life-threatening situation. Traumatic events might include a natural disaster, military combat, a serious car accident, a violent physical or sexual assault, or the sudden unexpected death of a close loved one. Trauma often makes the individual feel a loss of control over their safety.

Signs of Trauma Disorder

Living through a traumatic event can shake someone to the core. Trauma symptoms include:

  • Shock
  • Anger
  • Denial
  • Mood swings
  • Flashbacks
  • Nightmares
  • Insomnia or sleep disturbance
  • Persistent feelings of sadness and despair
  • Headache, intestinal problems
  • Feelings of guilt or shame
  • Emotional detachment
  • Feeling isolated
  • Hopelessness
  • Anxiety
  • Trust issues
  • Loss of interest in usual sources of enjoyment, withdrawing from friends and family
  • Substance abuse

What Is Trauma Counseling and How Does It Work?

When an individual is struggling to overcome the effects of the trauma to a point where it is negatively impacting daily functioning and quality of life, it is appropriate to seek treatment. Goals of overcoming trauma include reclaiming one’s personal power, to shift focus from the past to the present, and to reduce the impact that the trauma has on one moving forward.

Mental health professionals use a variety of modalities to help individuals overcome the intense effects of the trauma. These might include:

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.  TFCBT is designed for helping individuals overcome trauma by reshaping the thoughts associated with the trauma that led to the negative emotions and behaviors. By helping the trauma victim express their feelings about the experience, the therapist will show them how those thoughts have led to withdrawal, guilt, loneliness, anxiety, etc. By encouraging the individual to examine the negative thoughts and reframe them in a more productive manner, the trauma loses potency.

Psychodynamic Therapy. This is a longer-term therapy that delves into childhood experiences and how they may relate to issues in their adult life. The insights gained during psychodynamic therapy can help the individual develop a new perspective on those childhood experiences, as well as dysfunctional adult interpersonal relationships, how to rise above them and not allow them to negatively impact their present daily life anymore.

Exposure Therapy. This is a short-term behavioral therapy that helps individuals become less sensitive to the memories or triggers of the trauma. By encouraging discussion of the event and gradually exposing them to the triggers within a safe environment, the impact is gradually reduced over time. This helps with the avoidance behaviors they may have acquired following the trauma.

Adjunctive Therapies for Treating Trauma

In addition to the various traditional psychotherapies used, there are some excellent alternative therapies that compliment and augment those therapies. These include:

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). EMDR is a type of therapy that helps individuals by desensitizing them to the disturbing memories of the trauma. EMDR is an 8-phase program that focuses on the past, present, and future. The therapist will have the client follow an object or finger back and forth with their eyes while discussing the disturbing memory, the related emotions and beliefs, which has the effect of reducing the impact of the trauma over the course of the sessions.

Neurofeedback. Neurofeedback is a type of biofeedback where the individual’s brain wave patterns and activity can be modified through a computer software program, training the individual to be calmer when thoughts of the trauma arise.

Holistic Activities. Holistic practices can help promote relaxation while reducing stress, which can help in the response to thoughts of the trauma. Managing stress through deep breathing exercises, mindfulness meditation, guided imagery, yoga, massage therapy, and acupuncture can benefit the individual as they heal from the trauma.

When a Higher Level of Care is Appropriate for Trauma Disorder

When efforts to relieve the symptoms of trauma are not successful using outpatient services, it may be necessary to consider a higher level of care. Individuals whose trauma disorder is seriously impacting their daily life and their relationships may benefit from a more focused approach at a residential treatment center. This safe, supportive setting allows the individual to fully focus on getting better without the daily distractions and triggers that have so far impeded that effort. Customized treatment plans will provide the most tailored, intensive treatment approach to healing from the traumatic event and getting one’s life back.

Elevation Behavioral Health Provides Trauma Counseling in a Residential Setting

Elevation Behavioral Health is a residential mental health program in Los Angeles, California. Trauma victims who have not yet been able to move through the residual emotional pain find that the safe, supportive setting of a residential program helps them heal. Leaving the reminders or triggers of the trauma by residing at Elevation Behavioral Health for a period, patients find much needed solace. Individualized treatment plans incorporate a combination of relevant interventions to allow patients to move past the painful memories and regain control over their lives within a compassionate environment. For more information about trauma counseling and treatment options, please reach out to Elevation Behavioral Health today at (888) 561-0868.

When Depression Becomes Debilitating

Anyone who has struggled through a period of deep melancholy can attest to the intense power of emotions it triggers. We all suffer the occasional emotional fallout associated with difficult life events or circumstances. Pain endured from loss of a loved one, a divorce, loss of a job, diagnosis of a serious medical condition, or a broken heart can sideline us for a period, these phases commonly referred to as “the blues.” Most will manage to wind through the disappointment, fear, or sadness and the low mood will eventually stabilize with no intervention required.

For others, a cluster of pronounced symptoms may linger long after the triggering event, refusing to let up no matter how much time has passed. Depression can cause severe fatigue, impairing the person’s ability to function at work or at home. Even getting out of bed is a chore for those with serious depression. When depression becomes debilitating it is important to ensure the person is receiving the professional treatment they need, as an increased risk of suicide can develop.

Treatment for major depressive disorder must involve an integrated program that includes both traditional evidence-based therapies and medication, as well as holistic and experiential activities that enhance the treatment process by complimenting psychotherapy. Depression can be successfully treated and managed with the right combination of interventions.

About Major Depressive Disorder

Although major depressive disorder (MDD) affects about 16 million U.S. adults per year, only a small percentage of people actually seek out treatment. A stubborn stigma still surrounds mental health conditions, including depression, acting as a barrier to getting help. Some people may not know where to even begin to get help and instead continue to suffer in silence. As a result, some may begin to use alcohol or drugs to self-medicate as a means of masking the unbearable depression symptoms.

But treatment for MDD can be very effective, and should be sought out especially when depression becomes debilitating. The DSM-5 criteria for diagnosing depression involves five or more of the following symptoms having been present most of the time for more than two weeks:

1. Persistent depressed or sad mood
2. Recent unexplained weight gain or loss
3. Difficulty concentrating or making decisions
4. Fatigue
5. Lack of interest in the activities once enjoyed
6. Persistent feelings of hopelessness and despair
7. Irrational feelings of guilt or shame
8. Slowed thinking and motor skills
9. Obsessing about death or suicide

The cause of MDD is still widely unknown, although science has identified several potential factors in developing clinical depression. These include genetics, temperament, environmental factors, and brain chemistry/biology.

Dual Diagnosis

A dual diagnosis, which indicates a co-occurring substance use disorder, is present in a significant number of individuals who suffer from depression. This may come about when the individual begins to use the substance in order to find relief from the symptoms of MDD. Alcoholism is the most common coexisting disorder with MDD, only adding to the person’s misery. Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant, so instead of helping the individual, it only increases the intensity of their symptoms while also adding profound health risks.

A dual diagnosis creates a more complicated treatment strategy. It is now believed that, to achieve the best long-term treatment outcome both disorders, the MDD and the alcoholism, should be treated simultaneously. Dual diagnosis treatment requires specialized training, so treatment should be sought at dual diagnosis program when depression presents with a coexisting substance use disorder.

Treatment for Depression

There exists an industry standard within the field of mental health treatment for treatment of MDD. This traditionally includes both antidepressant therapy and psychotherapy. Antidepressants are plentiful, with about thirty different brands on the market for treating depression. Initially, a doctor will take a leap of faith in prescribing antidepressants for a patient, using their training and treatment criteria to select the medication best aligned with the patient’s needs. Antidepressants can take upwards of four weeks to begin to take effect, which can be frustratingly slow. If one drug does not show promise, the doctor will have the patient trial another drug, or may just adjust the dosage.

Psychotherapy involves talk therapy and is available in various modalities. Generally, in treating individuals with MDD, mental health practitioners may select a behavioral-based therapy like cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), or a cognitive-based therapy such as psychodynamic therapy. There are two main functions of psychotherapy for the depressed patient, to help them explore potential underlying pain points, such as a past trauma or other distressing life event, and to help the patient reshape their internal thought-behavior messaging and responses.

Holistic Therapies for Depression

When depression becomes debilitating, it is in the complimentary therapies that the most yardage is gained. That is because these holistic activities help the individual gain a deeper perspective into their spiritual being, discovering new insights about themselves that can become therapeutic breakthroughs. These activities include such things as mindfulness training, guided meditation, yoga, journaling, art therapy, and massage therapy.

In addition to the experiential activities, overcoming depression is enhanced by regular cardio exercise, such as daily walks, dance cardio, hiking, cycling, swimming, or running. Couple exercise with a nutritious diet of lean proteins, leafy greens, fresh fruits, whole grain breads and pasta, seeds and nuts, as this Mediterranean diet will promote improved brain health.

Elevation Behavioral Health Provides an Integrated Approach to Treating Depression

Elevation Behavioral Health is a luxury residential mental health and dual diagnosis treatment center in Southern California. Nestled in a tranquil canyon above Malibu, California, Elevation Behavioral Health provides an intimate six-bed setting for individuals in need of healing from depression, instead of an cold, institutional setting. The spacious and beautiful 10,000 square foot home features unmatched luxury in both the interior and exterior grounds.

This mental health and wellness program for depression or dual diagnosis is built upon a foundation of proven therapeutic modalities, such as CBT and DBT. Added to that are holistic therapies, such as yoga, mindfulness training, and meditation, to offer a fully integrated approach to depression treatment. When depression becomes debilitating, a serene, relaxing environment, compassionate therapists, and upscale accommodations can go a long way toward reintroducing joy in life. For more information, please contact Elevation Behavioral Health today at (888) 561-0868.

suboxone withdrawal timeline

Suboxone Withdrawal

Suboxone withdrawal can be painful, difficult, and long-lasting. Although the medication has proven useful for many people, the effects of coming off it can create a challenge.

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone® is the combination of buprenorphine and naloxone, and is used as a method of opioid replacement therapy. Initially introduced in the 1980’s, the mix of buprenorphine and naloxone helps to relieve symptoms of withdrawal from opioids. Whether an individual is withdrawing from Percocet, heroin, or morphine, Suboxone can be an effective aid in treating symptoms of withdrawal.

Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist. It is a semi-synthetic opioid derived from thebaine, a compound found in the opium poppy. As a partial opioid agonist, buprenorphine reaches the opioid receptors in the brain and can ease symptoms of withdrawal without producing the strong high that may be experienced with full agonists like heroin or oxycodone.

Naloxone, the other compound in Suboxone, effectively blocks the effects of opioids. When taking naloxone, somebody may use opioids but will not experience the euphoria or high normally produced. In addition to being a part of Suboxone, naloxone is sold as Narcan. Narcan is an injection given to those suffering from opioid overdose, and can reverse the effects of an overdose. When taken with buprenorphine, naloxone prevents a user from getting high from taking opioids.

Generally speaking, Suboxone is prescribed while an individual is coming off an opioid drug. Some individuals take it for a few days, while others may stay on it for months or years. Although the addiction treatment community seems to have varying opinions on it, current research on Suboxone suggests it to be an effective form of treatment.

What Causes Withdrawals?

Withdrawals begin when somebody stops taking Suboxone or lowers their dose. Because an individual has been taking the drug regularly, the brain has grown accustomed to functioning with it present. Lowering your dose can bring withdrawal symptoms, and you may go through Suboxone withdrawal cold turkey if you stop taking it completely. Withdrawal occurs because your brain is adapting to working without the substance present. This can cause a variety of symptoms in the brain and the physical body.

buprenorphine information

Symptoms of Withdrawal

Symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal may vary greatly. Each person has an individual case, and symptoms are dependent on the length of use, the individual’s health and body weight, and what dose they were taking. People who taper off Suboxone are likely to experience less severe symptoms than those that quit cold turkey. Symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal include:

  • Muscle stiffness and aches
  • Insomnia and daytime sleepiness
  • Indigestion and stomach aches
  • Anxiety and panic attacks
  • Irritability and anger
  • Fever, sweating, and chills
  • Headache and neck stiffness
  • Difficulty focusing
  • Nausea and vomiting

Suboxone Withdrawal Timeline

Suboxone withdrawal length may vary from individual to individual, and there are a variety of factors that may affect the timeline. These factors include how long the individual has been using, what their dose is, their individual weight and health, and the presence of any co-occurring disorders.

The general timeline of withdrawal from Suboxone looks like this:

  • 12-72 Hours

    During the first few days, symptoms generally get worse. They are likely to peak at around 72 hours after your last dose. During these first few days physical symptoms are generally at their worst, and the individual may experience nausea, vomiting, and sweating.

  • 3-7 Days

    During the following few days, an individual will likely experience muscle pain and aches. They also may experience difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep. Mood swings and depression may begin to arise during this first week.

  • 1-2 Weeks

    This period will generally see the symptoms begin to subside. Physical pain will improve, nausea and vomiting will subside, and the body will regain some energy. However, the person may begin to experience severe cravings and mood swings.

  • 2-4 Weeks

    Post-acute withdrawal symptoms may continue for a few weeks. During these weeks, an individual may find themselves experiencing intense cravings, bouts with depression, and irregular sleeping patterns. Because of dopamine depletion, the person may have difficulty experiencing joy or pleasure from normally pleasurable activities for weeks or months.

Suboxone Detox and Treatment

Suboxone is an opioid, and coming off it by yourself can be quite uncomfortable. Many people who try to detox from Suboxone at home end up relapsing due the the discomfort of withdrawal symptoms,, and it’s imperative you receive professional help in coming off the substance. At a medically-managed detox facility, trained clinicians and doctors will help you to come off Suboxone in the most comfortable and safe manner possible.

If you’re wondering how to deal with Suboxone withdrawal, we strongly recommending reaching out for help. At an addiction treatment center, you will be offered medical care, clinical attention, and a set of tools to get off Suboxone and live a healthy life in recovery. Call us today at (888) 561-0868.

Klonopin Withdrawal Symptoms

Klonopin® is the trade name of Clonazepam, a benzodiazepine approved by the FDA to treat seizure disorders and anxiety disorders. Klonopin was patented in the 1960’s and became available in the US in 1975. Since then, it has become a commonly abused recreational drug for its relaxing effects.

Klonopin withdrawal timeline

How Does Clonazepam Work?

Clonazepam increases gamma amino-butyric acid in the brain, which is more commonly known as GABA. The neurotransmitter works by inhibiting the central nervous system, creating a sense of ease, comfort, and muscle relaxation. Because it acts on the GABA receptors, withdrawal and detox from clonazepam can be quite uncomfortable and physically dangerous.

Klonopin has a longer half-life than many other benzodiazepines. The half-life of a drug is how long it stays in your system, and clonazepam’s is over twice as long as the related drug alprazolam (Xanax®). This makes clonazepam more well-suited for longer term care of anxiety disorders, and alprazolam more effective in short-term interventions. However, the long half-life leads to a long withdrawal process as it can take weeks or months for the drug to leave the system completely.

Klonopin Withdrawal

Like other benzodiazepines, klonopin withdrawal can be serious or fatal if not treated properly. As such, it is not advisable to stop taking clonazepam “cold turkey.” Generally, your doctor will wean you off the drug slowly over time in order to minimize discomfort and danger. It’s important to come off benzodiazepines correctly in order to maintain your health and comfort.

Klonopin Withdrawal Symptoms

The severity of symptoms in withdrawing from clonazepam depends largely on the individual. Factors in severity of withdrawal symptoms include amount of use, length of use, the individual’s health, and the presence of any co-occurring disorders.

Klonopin withdrawal symptoms may include:

  • Headache
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Hallucinations and/or nightmares
  • Memory loss/lapses
  • Irritability and mood swings
  • Anxiety and panic
  • High blood pressure
  • Impaired motor control
  • Depression, fatigue, and lack of motivation
  • Seizures

Psychological Symptoms of Withdrawal

Psychological Symptoms of Withdrawal

Like the withdrawal process from many substances, coming off klonopin can cause intense psychological symptoms. An individual coming off this benzodiazepine may experience waking hallucinations, intense nightmares, pervasive sadness, heightened anxiety and panic, severe drug cravings, and bouts of anger or rage.

Those detoxing from klonopin use are at a heightened risk of suicidal ideations. Along with the previously mentioned psychological symptoms that may arise, this makes klonopin withdrawal a dangerous process to go through alone. With proper medical attention and therapeutic care, these psychological symptoms can be eased in order to help the person detox with minimal discomfort.

Physical Symptoms of Withdrawal

As clonazepam impacts the GABA receptors in the brain, the withdrawal process is physically dangerous as well. When suddenly ceasing klonopin use, an individual may experience headaches, nausea, shaking, irregular sleep patterns, heightened blood pressure, dizziness, muscle tension and spasms, and irregular bowel movements.

In addition, more severe cases of klonopin withdrawal can result in the individual having seizures or falling into a coma. It’s important to know that the detox process can be incredibly dangerous and fatal. The physical symptoms of withdrawal make it imperative that you seek professional medical help when coming off klonopin.

Klonopin Withdrawal Timeline

Because klonopin is a long-acting benzodiazepine, the withdrawal process takes time and patience. Generally, withdrawal symptoms begin arising 2 or 3 days after the last use, which is when it begins to leave your system. During this time, an individual is likely to experience anxiety, insomnia, heightened blood pressure, fatigue, and mental confusion or memory lapses. During this period, the cravings for more clonazepam are often strong.

After a couple weeks, the acute withdrawal symptoms generally begin to subside. However, an individual may experience continued physical and psychological discomfort for weeks or months after. The longer-term withdrawal symptoms are often more mild, but may include anxiety, irregular sleeping patterns, and increased sensitivity to stress.

The timeline of withdrawal depends on the nature of the use and the individual’s biology. The longer you used klonopin, the more likely you are to experience a lengthy withdrawal process.

Klonopin Withdrawal Help

If you or somebody you know is coming off klonopin, it is crucial to seek help. Without help, klonopin withdrawal can be lethal. In addition to the physical dangers, the cravings from withdrawing can be overwhelming and lead the person to continue using.

Unfortunately, klonopin withdrawal needs to be monitored by professionals even if you’ve been taking it as prescribed. With a trained medical team, you can come off clonazepam and stay completely safe. At a quality treatment center or detox, you may be treated with medications, monitoring of vitals, and therapy. This level of care helps ensure your safety and comfort throughout this difficult process.

Many of us in recovery can tell you from experience that trying to get sober on your own rarely works. In fact, many of us tried this before we finally turned to some kind of help. When I was first thinking about getting sober I tried only going to AA meetings. When this didn’t work for me I tried going to only therapy. When I failed again, I finally realized that I needed more help and support. I checked myself into inpatient treatment where I went to regular recovery meetings, had individual and group therapy, and the support of so many people around me. My recovery started working when I became willing to get help from other people. Getting support didn’t mean that I was too weak to do it on my own. It just meant that I realized I didn’t need to make things harder on myself.
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1. Longer Programs Produce Better Results

One big reason not to go at it on your own is that the longer someone stays in treatment the more positive the results. The National Institute on Drug Abuse recommends a program of at least 90 days of inpatient treatment. In fact, one of the biggest obstacles in inpatient treatment is people dropping out. People who chose to stay in these programs and stay longer often do better than people who leave or go to a shorter program. Psychological research has supported this claim. A 2006 study by Moos & Moos found that those who got help were more likely than those who didn’t to stay sober for at least three years.

2. Addiction Treatment Requires Follow Up

According to the National Institute of Heath, treatment for addiction requires continual follow up and monitoring. This is true of any chronic disorder or disease. For example, if you were suffering from diabetes you might need to be hospitalized and work closely with a doctor until everything stabilized. After that you might step down to regular check ins with the doctor and monitoring your own blood sugar. The same kind of care is needed for addiction. Going to inpatient treatment then following a step down program like intensive outpatient and sober living allows people to have more follow up support in recovery. Follow up like this gives people a big network of people to reach out to when they need help or aren’t doing well.

3. Different Things Work for Different People

Another reason to get support in your early recovery is that different things work for different people. Maybe you know someone who is sober and know what they did in order to start their recovery. The problem is that what works for one person won’t work for everyone. Addiction, treatment, and recovery are not one size fits all. The 1998 MATCH study found that recovery rates depended on matching personal characteristics with the correct type of recovery program for them. In some cases this meant an emphasis on 12 step treatment but for others it meant cognitive behavioral therapy. Although this research is a little dated, the findings still hold true. When finding help for addiction it is important to find the right kind of help. Rather than going it on your own it can be important to reach out to someone who can help you find the right kind of facility or program for you.

4. More is Better

Another reason to get support in your recovery is that doing different recovery activities has an additive effect according to research by Hillhouse, PhD. This means that treatment plus a twelve step program is better than just treatment on its own. Rather than trying to recover from drug an alcohol addiction with self-help books, it is better to do everything that you can. Going to treatment or only attending only AA meetings might work for some people but for most people it is better to do more. This is also a great reason to check out more than one step-based recovery program, have individual and group therapy, and to have a sponsor and a therapist. All of these different recovery activities will help with something different, so do as many as you’re able to!

5. Recovery is More than Abstinence

It is true that recovery often begins with abstinence from drugs, alcohol, or process addictions. However, recovery is much more than abstinence. According to the NIH effective treatment attends to multiple needs of the individual, not just substance use. It might be possible to stop drinking or doing drugs on your own. However, it is much harder to deal with the underlying causes of the addiction without any help. The reason that so many people turn to professionals for help is that they can treat the root of the problem. Often drug and alcohol abuse is a symptoms of an underlying issue that is unresolved. By getting support you can get help staying clean and feeling better as well.

6. Self-Detox can be Dangerous

This is a huge reason to get support in your recovery. It can be risky and even life threatening to stop taking drugs or alcohol without assistance. The National Center for Biotechnology Information has published research that withdrawal from alcohol and benzodiazepines has caused death in some patients. Klonopin withdrawal, for example, may cause seizures, high blood pressure, and suicidal ideations. Due to the dangers of self-detox it is recommended that people who are trying to come off of drugs or alcohol get help doing so.

7. Medication Might be Necessary

Aside from a medically assisted detox, some people need medication throughout recovery. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration favors what is called medication-assisted treatment. This might not be necessary for all people but some do require medication. For example, during treatment someone might discover that they have an underlying depression or anxiety disorder. If this is the case the treatment plan might include medication. It is very hard if not impossible to get the proper medication if you do not have support from a doctor in your recovery.

8. You’ll Get Help in Other Areas

My final reason to reach out for support is that most treatment programs will help you find a job, go back to school, and find housing when you’re ready. Perhaps you can find a reputable sober companion to work with. As I have said more than once in this post, recovery is about more than just not drinking and using. Having this help to find work or pursue your passion can be incredibly helpful when you are going through a period of change. When you try to get sober by yourself there is no one there to help you navigate these life changes.